Left unattended

I’m in all on my own, and I should really be packing my bags for tomorrow’s trip down to the Lakes, but I find myself sitting with a cuppa and getting all wistful instead.
I’ve been looking at maps which have been sparking as many memories as they have moments of inspiration. I’ve had a DVD on of the old West Highland Railway Line, engines toiling up Glen Almond or arriving at Ballachulish Station, and now I’m working my way through Weir’s Way.
It’s a timely reminder of where my heart lies and where my inspiration comes from.
In these days where everything is engineered to look like a super sexy product or lifestyle choice that’ll make you better than you were before, be it a simple day’s hillwalking or a £400 jacket, watching an old bloke in a hand-knitted woolly bunnet wandering around Scotland telling a wee story, reaches into me and plucks a perfect note that makes my heart sing.
That’s something that no sponsored athlete exploits, advertising campaign imperatives or completed tick-list will ever bring to me.
It’s just the same feeling as I find when I’m sitting by my tent with the steam rising from the mug in my hand, simple joy. Hold onto it.

11 thoughts on “Left unattended

  1. Tom Weir was one of a kind. I was hooked onto hill walking through him too. Maybe once all this gear obsession subsides we’ll find the simplicity of Weir’s way of doing things. Mind you, it was all a lot quieter in his days, roads and hills, the lot. He had a good life, the old bunnet…

  2. Abso-fecking-lutely. Got the Weir’s Way box set a few years ago.

    What do we get now in the way of outdoor TV shows? The Adventure Show is pretty ‘meh’. I suppose Ray Mears seems to share Weir’s genuine love the outdoors, but when did you last see him up a hill?. Bear Grylls? He’s not fit to lace Weir’s boots.

    What about ‘McFarlane’s Way’? You have the obligatory facial hair. Though you’ll need to get rid of all that synthetic shite you wear. Wool only. And not the pansy-ass Merino stuff you keep going on about, proper horrible, scratchy stuff. And big leather boots…

    STV, are you listening? :)

  3. Aye, a grand bloke – still got his books on the shelf from when I got seriously outdoors late 70s/ early 80s. I remember the TV shows too, got a few of them on DVD a while ago.

    With all that low-tech woolly kit (and an ice axe as long as a radio mast) how on earth did he survive to such a ripe old age?!! ;O)

  4. Visited Tams grave on the way back from Arrochar Alps a couple of times, what a guy. Its true that when you read his books you hear his voice saying the words :)

  5. Good thing about Tom Weir’s programmes was it wasn’t just about hills, it was about people, wildlife, history etc. And yes, life was simpler back then wasn’t it, wonder what he’d make of today’s gear/technology!

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