Kit stuff

The top of Beinn Ime is rocky, either wide expanses of it, or broken stretches bonded together by some earth. Not ideal for tent pegs.
But, a mix of all the new pegs ensured that all the guy points were solid all night.
The Y’s went in with a little difficulty due to their size, but once in they didn’t budge. I had to hammer one in with a rock and I did bend the top section above the little scallops, but it was sound. The Vargo nails were a cinch, both widths slipped into the ground with ease and their length made sure they stayed there.
The dyneema guy points were tight and despite some harsh winds stayed tight.
Breaking camp in the rubbish weather was definitely improved by having the cords on all the pegs, no gloves sliding in metal, no bare fingers getting cold and caught on sharp edges.

Did I notice any extra weight? Nah, all I got was an easier pitching, a sturdier tent and quicker striking when I appreciated it the most.
So, ultimate low weight gets a slap on the legs, and perfect compomise steals your daffodils and runs down the street to give them to his granny once again.

12 thoughts on “Kit stuff

  1. So titanium ‘nails’ do the job – was there anything to choose between the 3 and 4mm versions? I recall Mattc saying they were the business at 4mm – what’s the view on the lighter option?

    I still like the square section pegs that came with my Lightwave, but the option of installing a cord does seem a great idea as you highlight above.

  2. Function over weight any day. Nothing worse than useless tent pegs on a cold windy wet day. The 1g and 2g wonders from Terra Nova ain’t up to much. I always upgrade my pegs to something useful. Smart move PTC.

  3. Absolutely spot on.

    When I bought my Akto (back in 1995) they used to come with pathetic little v-pegs, so I bought my TNF golden nails which never once let me down.

    With the Warmlite 2C purchase in 2007, the rear peg and the front two are absolutely crucial for the tent standing up, so I upgraded all the pegs to the titanium Tornados from Clamcleats. Bomb-proof they are! Not once let me down in some horrendous storms. N point in having a magnificent tent if it falls over with crappy pegs, is there?

    These manufactureres are just supplying rubbish pegs to make the weights look good.

  4. I knew the 4mm Ti nails were good because I’ve been using them for about 3 years. I got the 3mm ones last autumn and so far they’ve proved just as reliable (and really great when the ground was frozen solid). I think someone said they managed to bend one once (!) but I haven’t even come close :)

  5. Cheers Matt – that’s the kind of long term test and feedback I like :-)

    Anyone know if the Alpkit Ti nails are as good as the Vargo ones? Are they all main in the same factory etc. etc.?

  6. I was out last Thursday in my LC and I used the 2g ti ones every where except the end peg points and end guys – I always use Y-pegs for there. I was above a loch at over 400m but woke up to glass calm water in the morning and the tent was still taut as a drum. The TN ti ones are fine in good conditions.

    btw, I like the comment about stealing daffodils. Me and the kids actually saw a guy knicking daffodils from the roadside in Old Kilpatrick yesterday, what a laugh we had. He must have forgot to buy his mum a mothers day present and was ‘improvising’ – how low can a man sink?

  7. John, it was quite a big rock :o)

    The new pegs are great, especially on rough ground. I used the wee red wire originals for about a year and they were fine on easier ground, but they are more fiddly and time consuming, so I’m happy with the trade off.

    Old Kiklpatrick and Bowling are covered in daffs at the moment, it’s very nice. I haven’t picked one, honest mister.

  8. Having looked at the Alpkit nails at the Outdoor Show and decided I would try the Clam Cleat Y pegs instead I was delighted to see there is an April sale – £7.50 for 12 pegs was just too much (little?) to resist.

    Now to see if the blue anodising clashes with my red Lightwave pegs ;-)

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