Inov8 roclite 370 update

I had a lots of comms when I first featured these, and a lot of comms since asking how they were doing.
Well, the biggest point to note is that they’re completely different to the Gore lined 390’s. The only similarities my feet found are the visual ones.

The whole boot is softer, more supple. This includes the ankle cuff which doesn’t strangle movement the way I found the 390’s did, contouring, catching a slip, moving quickly across mixed and rough terrian in much more possible for me in the 370’s. They do feel more like a trail shoe with a high ankle that the bigboot with a bendy sole vibe I got from the 390’s.
Sizing was an issue for many people with the 390’s, and although the 370’s dimensions look identical when you put the two models side by side, the 370’s fits me better. The Gore liner is a factor in this, and now I’m wondering if a half-way house softshell shoe in between the two models would be ideal, some of that nano-bollocks we’re seeing in the gear news just now sprayed onto the 370?

I digress.
The outsole is the familiar roclite small bock pattern and matched to the flexible midsole gives reliable grip and dexterity over agood range of terrain. Water comes straight in the mesh, and sweat goes straight back out. That’s a good deal for me. They dry quick as well, there’s not an abundance of spongey material to hold onto any moisture. Which brings me too my next point; suitability. These are boots for trail shoe folk, trad boot wearers will be all tears and snotters if they lace these up and head onto rough terrain unless they get some miles in first to get their feet conditioned.
But, that means Inov8 got it right this time. A high cuff to stop shit getting in your shoe and padding to stop you getting the occasional ding on your ankle and all the benefits of a bendy trail shoe.
I care not for waterproofness, but I’m going to go back and reassess the 390’s and see if I missed something the first time round. My feet have been constantly changing the last couple of years as my footwear de-evolves. So I’ll get a few trips in and report back on those as well.

But, the 370’s? I like them so far. But I can’t give a definitive answer on them, I think it must be one of the most subjective pieces of kit out there as the reaction to them is going to be such a personal thing.
They’re also in a class of one, so what can you compare them to?
Try them in a shop, if they fit it’s worth the gamble.

13 thoughts on “Inov8 roclite 370 update

  1. Interesting. I’m one of those who ordered the 390s based on good Terroc fit, only to send them back in disappointment when they felt rotten.

    I don’t have much choice thought – Inov8 only do a few models in size 14, but that’s a few models more than most manufacturers (New Balance do as well…and ..er… Columbia… and…er…. Merrell)

  2. The Terrocs fit me very well too, the roclite fit is pretty different, aye.

    Size 14? Jeez, that does limit your options. Do KSBs come that big? They used to do a huge range of sizes in the old days.

  3. Indeed – the perils of having to launch footware with a bottle of champagne.

    For trail shoes its fine – Terrocs fit and the seem to suit me.

    Finding a pair of lightweight boots for winter is a mare though. I used to have a pair of Brasher Hillmasters(?), which come in 14. Many scoffed at Brashers in winter, but I was happy to front pointed in them – I found the ankle support really poor though.

    Meindl do a couple of models up to size 15, but they are not what you would call light. Some Hi-tec’s come in 14, but only the one’s the look like they were designed in the 1950’s.

    At the moment, I’m still using my ‘robust’ Scarpa SLs in the winter months. Good boots that fit well and all that but…well you get my drift.

    Get your mate at Fast and Light on the case!

  4. Message passed on!

    I hd a set of Brasher Hillmaster years back and they were fine, I used Stubai 10-pointers on them.
    I’ll need to try a pair of contemporary Brashers on and see if I’m missing something.

  5. Hmm, I ought to be tempted by the 370s… but I equate a high ankle with keeping my feet dry (preferably without goretex), otherwise why bother? I’ve not really found much problem with crud getting into trail shoes – but I might change my mind on that, heading for the Dolomites tomorrow with my 5.10 Camp Fours :)

    I’m taking boots as insurance – at the moment it’s my La Sportiva Trango S Evos (or will it be the Meindl Borneos? ;). I keep wondering about the Roclite 390s but probably not…. I did try them again at Kinlochleven the other week and they were better than I expected, but I only get a decent fit with a thick winter sock, so still not ideal. I wonder how the 370s and 390s can turn out so different?

  6. I did talk to Inov8 about this and they say it’s partly the lack of the layers that make up the Gore part and also the sole flex is different. Tha last is the same though.

    Enjoy your trip, I’m just off as well.
    I’ll be back tomorrow though, ah well :o)

  7. Cheers PTC, I’m just starting to find the 315’s a bit under gunned on the really rocky terrain i’m walking on over here. I love the Roclite sole, it’s absolutely perfect but I just want a bit more ‘shoe’ to protect the feet and maybe the tiniest smidge more width. And then I’ve got winter to think about but I’ll ask you about that over by the Swedish shoes with the sharp, pointy teeth…

  8. Re. the Brashers. To clarify – I tend to over-supinate (i.e walk on the outside of my feet, and I went over my ankles a lot in my Hillmasters (hence my comments about ankle support). It doesn’t happen in the Terrocs, and I couldn’t do it if I wanted to in SLs.

  9. Just back from the Dolomites and in response to Holdfast’s comment on the Roclite 315s and a bit more protection for rocky terrain….. I took my 5.10 Camp Fours to Italy and they were fantastic!! Not quite as light as Inov-8s, but grip like limpets, great cushioning, and plenty of rubber armour for the really rough stuff :)

    I didn’t hit the Via Ferrata on this trip but I was confident enough in them that I would have. The only possible downside for Norway is how quickly they’ll dry – not a problem I faced this time.

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