Haglöfs Flint Pants

I said “Haglöfs should do a softshell version of the Rugged Mountain Pants” to which they said, “You’re an idiot, you’ve already seen them, the Flint Pant“. How right they were, and I’ve got a pair on test to prove it.

They are similar to the Rugged’s in a few ways, but they’re definitely not a photocopy printed on stretchy fabric. The big zipped and mesh-lined thigh pockets are the thing I like, so damned handy and that front facing positioon is great for a map. The stretchy fabric lets you cram stuff in too.
The fabric is Flexable 4-way stretch, a kinda light to midweight variety, not totally windproof so will work most of the year round and will be fine with longjons in winter. I’ve used various Flexable fabrics plenty over the past few years and it’s good stuff, sweat management, drying times and wind and water repellancy are all excellent. Constant washing and wearing  is no problem either, a lot of polyamide in the mix gives it longevity.
Own brand fabrics should be seen by us as an equivalent not lesser choice, and that goes for all the manufacturers. Well, apart from some waterproof membranes which are just rebranded clingfilm. Anyway, I digress.
Three other zipped pockets and a prefitted belt on a nicely sculpted and smoother waist finish off the top end.

The knees have been toughened up with the heavier Flexable, they’re well shaped though and still stretchy so no restriction or resistance. Further down, the ankle cuffs have some business going on. The lower legs are zipped and have Keprotec crampon patches but the best upgrade over the Ruggeds are the internal gaiters. They’re double-poppered, have an inner silicon grip strip and drawcord adjustment. No lace hook so they’ll only stay put on boots, but I’m used to fitting my own hooks, ah it’s a bootcentric world out there still.
I rarely wear regular gaiters these days so for non-summer trips these fit the bill perfectly, in fact I can see these coming out to play right into winter as the whole pant has a nice balance between comfort, protection and usability.

Cracking pair of pants, they’ve been seen in action on here already and they’ll be staying near the top of the washing pile.

 

15 thoughts on “Haglöfs Flint Pants

  1. I haven’t used any fancy washing stuff for a few years now, everything goes in non-bio powder/tabs/liquid together here since the wee yin’s been about, no time for anything else. Here’s the thing, I haven’t noticed any difference in fabric performance.

  2. Interesting. I wondered having chucked my new Montane Terra’s in the ordinary wash whether I’d defeated the DWR. Not that I’ll do anything about it if it has, at least not until the next Paramo washing session.

  3. DWR can get stripped by bio detergents, but extra rinsing should help, washing with non bio next time to take out the ordinary wash residue as well, scent stuff, colour brighteners etc, all gets jammed in there as well.

    Fancy soaps that add water repellancy etc add water repellancy to everything, including the surfaces where do don’t want it like the inside of a membrane waterproof jacket.
    A DWR that’s actually part of the fabric rather than a treatment or coating is the way forward, that and regular, cheap, soap.

  4. The trimmed down Speeds compare well to the Flints, the pocket layouts are very different but the capacity is good on both. The Speeds layer better as the’re a slimmer fit and cleaner designed and the Flint’s are a great general use outdoor pant.
    I’d say the Flints dry quicker, but as ever with me it’s a bit unscientific, just what I’ve found.
    The Flints are a bit more forgiving of my shape :o)

  5. I know that it’s all subjective & your tolerance of cold/wet will be different to mine BUT what would you prefer for winter? The Speed or the Flint?

    Notes:
    1) I’ve got something for climbing so this would be walking only.
    2) I don’t really want to wear long johns so something with normal keks……..:o)
    3) Don’t like anything too heavy.

  6. Ah, tricky questions.

    The Flint’s are lighter than the Ruggeds, less wind resistant but I think better at moisture management, coming from within and without.
    They layer better under shell pants, but for colder winter days, especially with wind I’ll need longjons for sure.
    Preference wise, the Speeds are great for day trips, but for tent living the Flint’s are probably better. Difficult though as they’re not really like for like.

  7. Thanks for that. Reading slightly between the lines I don’t really think that there’s something there for me(sans long johns) in the winter…….back to the drawing board.

  8. My standard winter legwear for the past few years has been a pair of Haglofs Omni pants. Still in Flexable, but totally windproof version with a soft inner face. Best winter pants I’ve ever had.
    Tried a pair of Patagonia guide somethings which wear great, waterproof arse and knees and softshell elsewhere, brown they were?!
    Mammut somethings too, nice design and fabric sewn together badly, my crotch unravelled on one trip.
    Still need longjons under all of those on the coldest days though.

  9. Wore my Rugged’s the past couple of days and they are pretty different.
    I think if you’re happy with the Rugged’s and aren’t looking for something else you’re fine, but if you want a midweight stretchy softshell these are a good starting point.
    I’m wearing the Flint’s on a trip next week and as it’s a bit colder now I’ll maybe have some update info.

  10. Cool. Think I’ll save that £100-odd for something else. BTW – totally agree with the above re. washing. Household detergent does the business. No fabric softener, a wee DWR spray now and again and I don’t notice the difference on my kit from the days I monopolised the family laundry for hours of proofing!

  11. Just throwing the Flint’s in the wash (with Fairy non-bio…). Great pants, just a bit softer and lighter than the Ruggeds.
    It was cold last night and a quite windy and I had no real chilling while I was pottering about, I think they’ll do okay in the snow with longjons.

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.