Haglöfs 2012 Winter Kit Review #3 – Endo II Pull

What’s Haglöfs own description of the new Endo II Pull? “Anorak version of our popular Endo jacket“. Anyone that actually calls an anorak and anorak is okay in my book.

I reviewed the jacket version a while back here and the anorak version is very similar. At 304g for my pre-production size large it shaves off 18g from the jacket and the construction is a little different.
Pull-ons are good, I like the clean front and lack of faff. Sure you’ve got to move yourself around slightly more to take it on and off, but if you’re using that excuse to buy a full zip then I think your next stop should be the physio. Or couch.
Mind you, the Endo is slim fit and with it being a pull-on, if you’re not already Endo shaped, you’re going to be articulating mild frustration in the manner of a middle aged wifie on all fours trying to fish out a gobstopper that’s rolled under the couch, ie “Humph!”
Once it’s on it’s a joy though, there’s completely free movement and no excess fabric or features, it’s minimalism done right. I’ve sang the praises of Gore-Tex’s Active Shell before and it’s as good as ever here, married to a design that is kinda what the fabric was originally intended for. We’re seeing it creep into ever more mainstream jackets which will be interesting to see what happens if punters are expecting regular durability from a lightweight performance fabric.

The Endo Pull’s feature are what makes it so usable. I’ve had the Endo in high winds, snow and rain and it was no less protective than a jacket weighing more than twice as much. The hood, while still light, has face drawcords, external crown adjustment and a stiffened peak. It’s a mountain hood, shields your eyes and you can tuck your chin in when it’s zipped right up.

The same genius cuffs carry over from the jacket version, softshell palms and thumbloops. Cool weather protection of justice. The same non-membrane softshell fabric makes up the external zipped pocket, which being stretchy can take a good load of bits and pieces and of course avoids a sweaty patch on your baselayers by not hindering the breathability with a double layer of shell fabric.
That carries on through the Endo, even more so than on the jacket, lots of fabric and not so many seams making this as breathable all over as possible. I know they tried the same trick with the Oz and Ozo, but it’s better here. A little extra weight makes this a better smock.

A lot of what I’ve got to say would just be repeating the jacket review and what I’ve found since has just reinforced my opinions on the Endo design. I know fit affects my opinion here, the cut of the Endo Pull is spot-on for me, slim with just enough room for an equally slim midlayer under it. This makes all your fabrics work well and it’s been a remarkably dry experience sweating up wintry slopes in the Endo.
I know there’s always a doubt about how much use the Active Shell will take. My original Endo Jacket has been hammered, I had in on last week and there’s areas of the inner scrim have been worn away, it’s as soft as a 1970’s Black Sabbath tour shirt you just bought on ebay, but it’s still breathing and not letting the water in. Haglöfs use the polyamide outer fabric that others are now starting to use, maybe these thing do make a difference?

I loved the jacket and the Pull has everything the jacket has except half a zip. In use the Pull sits neater at the front without the zip, might be a height thing, but all smocks sit neater I think.
It’s fit and forget when you wear it, it’s pack and forget when you don’t. It really is one of those rare bits of kit where I wouldn’t change a single thing. Well, maybe they they could do some other colours…

7 thoughts on “Haglöfs 2012 Winter Kit Review #3 – Endo II Pull

  1. Hi, greeting from Utah!

    Thank you for blogging about Haglofs products. Very informative. The jacket I am looking for is the new Haglofs Fin Hood (purple, xxl I think 47″ chest). I am looking for a backcountry jacket. Basically I hike in a nike drifit baselayer and patagonia R1 1/4 zip most of the time. I would like to carry only 1 jacket (no extra mid layer) which I would use in the early morning when it’s cold, taking a break and for the descent where it being windproof is a huge plus.

    So basically a windproof jacket with some warmth, excellent hood (best I have used so far is a norrona one that cinched down great, blocked the sun and what not, but after one wash it broke) and light weight. Gunning for 500-700grams.

    Any other jackets I should be looking at? Cotswold has most new season jackets BUT the fin hood =(. They are the only store I have found that will ship to USA with no problems.

    Or maybe you can mail me one in exchange for free lodging in Utah this winter!

    Also the suta hood looks like a nice choice but seams heavier, more of a resort jacket, and no cool purple color.

    Really appreciate an expers advice!

  2. Hello!

    The Fin looks good, the fabrics are probably right for what you want to do. I’ve tried on a sample but I can’t remember much detail now. I know it’s desiged as your outer layer, proper hood, good features.
    If I remember right the Fin is the “spiritual” replacement for the Sharkfin which was discontinued a while back, it was their well respected top-end mountaineering jacket, so hopefully the Fin has something of that in its design.

    If you get the size right, you could be on a winner.

    I don’t know how much they can help, but Haglofs UK are reachable here info@haglofs.co.uk Maybe they could point you towards retailers closer to home, or stock avalable in the UK?

    Let me know how you get on!

  3. Thanks for the reply. Here’s an update.

    I e-mailed info@haglofs.co.uk and did not get a response. The folks over at cotswoldsoutdoor have been super responsive via e-mail. Although they didn’t have the item on hand they attempted to answer my questions to their best ability.

    I purchased a Haglofs Verte Jacket xxl in green from their “extended range” while I waited for the fin hood jacket. Looked like a great ski resort shell, and if it was light enough then it would double for my backcountry purposes.

    This jacket … well let me start with that this jacket is a poorly constructed jacket.
    Construction flaws:
    1- main zipper gets stuck on neck/storm flap. it’s a pain to undo and happens often
    2- both hand pockets aren’t stitched propely and the fabric snags when closing the zips. A big annoyance and it will rip the pocket fabric if one is not careful. Pockets are just swimming in jacket.
    3-shock cord to pull hood back doesn’t do anything
    Design Flaws:
    1- Hood is way too long and stays in place oddly
    2- Hood cinch cord (horizontal one) doesn’t work properly because the other cord doesn’t work, should just be one cord done up and to the side vs this config. Tons of jackets with the standard adjustments work better (examples marmot rom, norrona lyngen windstopper, Patagonia wintersunhoody)
    3- Zipped inner pocked is stitched to outer side of the mesh drop in pocked vs the shell…someone didn’t read the design spec right or poor design…

    I took a risk buying overseas and may now be stuck with return shipping/duty fees. I did this knowingly but this jacket has really ruined my take on Haglofs Outerwear. At the same time I was able to try some Haglofs stuff from sierratradingpost.com (Couloir pants, old pelamis jacket) and I have to say Haglofs is no where near Arcteryx/Peak Performance/Marmot/Patagonia gear. There website is great, design/colors look great, but their products in my limited experience are mediocre at best with some being unusable.
    I appreciate the help and maybe Haglofs is too much a commercial brand that has strayed from quality?

    I believe I gave them a fair shot!

  4. Bummer it didn’t work out after taking the gamble.

    I’m surprised that no one got back to you from Haglofs, because I know someone read your email as we were talking about it last week

    I’ll forward your comments on and see what happens, I feel bad about all this after being a point of reference.

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